Engineering Tomorrow award

  • To encourage and support the Engineers of Tomorrow, the Foundation behind Danfoss, the Bitten and Mads Foundation, is awarding a scholarship worth 10,000 EUR to a group of talented engineering students.

    The idea of designing, planning, managing a process and product production is vital. We look for students that’s able to create, develop and streamline the work through digital engineering. Danfoss want to grow the interest in science and get much closer to universities all over Europe.

    The prize is awarded to students who, through studies and projects focusing on energy efficiency, energy use, smart city and connectivity, have managed to point out new ways to promote knowledge within the climate and energy agenda.

    Last year nominees

    In 2016 two interesting project made it to the finale. Almir and Emil took the Scholarship with a project recognizing and visualizing energy consumption patterns of buildings using data mining.

    • They were selection because of their ability to search/investigate how:
      • we are able to monitor
      • predict 
      • and control the energy consumping in building      
       

    “Your thought are very much in line with the Danfoss way of thinking, where Plan Do Check Act is the foundation” said Danfoss CEO Niels B. Christiansen at the ceremony. The project applies statistical methods and machine learning to better understand and manage energy consumption in buildings. The project's focus was on creating a building energy management system which creates value by solving a number of problems for energy managers. 

    The resulting software system is a website which presents information regarding heat, water and electricity consumption of buildings. The website enables energy managers to maintain information about buildings, detect faults, avoid leaks and compare buildings in respect to their consumption patterns. Additionally a user test shows that the system extracts useful information about consumption patterns, which makes many tasks for energy managers easier, and enables them to make more informed decisions

    Alim and Emil worked very independently and dedicated to solve real-world problems together with the external partner in the project Odense Municipality. They managed to develop novel ideas, implement them in prototypes and demonstrate the advantages of their ideas on real-world data from 800 buildings. In their solutions they applied advanced statistical and machine learning methods.

    Watch a video about last year’s nominees

    How to apply

    All projects need to be uploaded to the registration site. The site is open from January 2018.

    Timing

    • January 2018: Registration site open:
      • Please upload/send us information about the nominated group, including project 
      • transcript of examination papers,
      • other relevant documentation
      • and contact details. 
    • May 2018: Nomination of candidates
    • June 2018: The winners will be announced in the beginning of June 2018. 
    • June 2018: The winning project towners will be invited to Danfoss Headquarters where a ceremony will take place.
  • Read project insights for this year's three nominees:

    Project 1:

    “This contribution seeks to modernize the archaic communication documents that are exchanged between customers and robotics engineers. By facilitating more streamlined communication methods, which were tested and verified for this thesis by multiple automation companies, companies could potentially save millions per automation project in development costs. These savings are made possible by exploring current viable digital technologies as well as potential future technologies.

    Explored technologies include: photospheres, 360-degree video, live media annotation, area 3D mapping, holoportation, virtual reality technologies, augmented reality technologies, and more. The technologies were explored for viability, and those deemed most viable now make up the new platform for robotics automation communication, creating a simple, understandable, and accessible platform for both customers and engineers.” - Jakob Hviid

    Project 2:

    Netlab, is a student driven club, focused on implementation and research in the field of self-driving cars. The students consist of a broad spectrum of engineering backgrounds. Within this field the club focuses on vehicle-to-vehicle communication. A miniature city has been created to both test and illustrate concepts such as a self-driving taxa service. The cars communicate amongst each other to exchange information about their route and movement. This information allows the cars to handle the intersections without traditional traffic rules and traffic lights. The intersection logic is fully distributed allowing the cars to make their own decisions. The ability to handle intersections, only based on communication between cars, has been one of the most prominent results of this project. To achieve this, several features are required to make the cars self-driving. The control solution on-board each car is a Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller with integral action. The control solution is composed of an extended Kalman filter and a Linear Quadratic Regulator. The local path planning on each car is performed with a combination of a Dijkstra algorithm and a virtual potential field.

    Project 3:

    "Renewable energy resources are most commonly connected to the power grid through inverters. Increasing amount of inverter-connected systems have globally important effect on the grid performance. Mismatches between the grid and the inverter impedances may cause harmonic resonances, which can lead to instability of the grid. Accurate models of these impedances are required for analyzing grid stability.

    Measurements based on pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) provide a fast method for continuously evaluating the grid impedance in real-time without distorting the grid significantly. For stable operation, adaptive controller of the inverter adjusts the control parameters automatically according to the online impedance measurements. To verify the methods a power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) setup is used to attain real-world conditions in experiments." - Tommi Reinikka and Roni Luhtala, Tampere University of Technology

  • Are you the new Postgraduate in Danfoss?

    Meet Nilay, Martin and Maria and hear them talk about why they have chosen Danfoss Postgraduate Program, what they expect to learn during the two-year program, and why they think the Program is a great way to kick-start your career.

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